Managing Upwards: Why Use Performance Objectives?

performance objectivesIn my blog ‘Using Performance Objectives for Managing Upwards’ I explained how you could use performance objectives to encourage your manager to get clear with you about their expectations of your performance. I’ve since been asked the question;

Why do I need to write my own performance objectives? Isn’t that my manager’s job?

It’s certainly a good question (and one I should have addressed earlier I guess!). Let’s begin with looking at the benefits of using performance objectives

The benefits of using performance objectives

Here are some of the benefits:

• Objectives are all about clarity – you get clearer on what good performance in your job looks like

• Using objectives helps you see where you and your job fit in to the ‘bigger picture’

• It’s much easier to ACCURATELY and FAIRLY monitor, measure, review and appraise your performance when your performance monitored, measured, reviewed and appraised against agreed objectives

• It’s much easier for BOTH YOU AND your manager to accurately and fairly monitor, measure, review and appraise staff performance when we are reviewing that performance against agreed objectives

• Using objectives means you can monitor your own performance against those objectives. This means you get the information you need to identify a)any areas for improvement b) any areas of outstanding performance c) and training or development needs

• It’s much easier for you to get useful, accurate, evidence-based and non-subjective feedback on your performance when your performance is measured against objectives

OK, but I still (maybe) have a question to answer

Yes I understand the value of performance objectives but why should I write them? Can’t my manager do that?

The Benefits of You Writing Your Own Performance Objectives

Here are some of the benefits to you of writing your own performance objectives:

• When you and your manager write your performance objectives you gain a more balanced and accurate view of what good performance looks like in your job – because it’s not just your manager’s view. Who do you think is best placed to describe what good performance looks like in YOUR job? (you know, the job YOU do every day?)

• Your performance will be monitored, measured, reviewed and appraised against the objectives you agree with your manager. The more input you have into writing the objectives the more influence you have over how your performance is monitored, measured, reviewed and appraised

• When you become involved in writing your own objectives you become fully involved in how your performance is managed. If your performance management system impacts how you are rewarded and / or promoted, that’s just got to be a good thing!

Writing your own performance objectives summary

So, three key reasons you should be part of writing your objectives; balance and accuracy, influence over how your performance is measured and reviewed, involvement in how your performance is managed. What’s not to like?

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